?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

neologism

Our older cat, Taiki, has had the habit for some time, when chorale and I sit close together, of pushing himself between us and crying for attention. So from time to time I call him "the thruster between," by analogy to, for example "the burrower beneath" in the Cthulhu mythos. It's long seemed to me that this could plausibly be given a Latin paraphrase.

Checking our Latin dictionary lately, I found that one of the verbs for "thrust" or "push" is trudere, the root, for example, of English "intrude" and "protrude." Adding the preposition as a prefix, I get verb intertrudere and derived agent noun intertruditor. In English it would be "intertruder," but I think I like the sound of the Latin. . . .

Comments

amedia
Apr. 29th, 2016 03:07 am (UTC)
I like this quite a lot--and it was remarkably well timed!

My Latin class hasn't officially had trudo or any of its compounds as a vocabulary word yet, but they did get a form of it tossed into a reading and glossed on the side, as often happens in our textbook.

We got it Monday, not all that long after you posted this. So I went over the verb with them as usual--we talked about intruder/intrusion/intrusion and extruders and protrusions and all kinds of fun stuff. Then I told them about "intertruditor," and they *loved* it.
whswhs
Apr. 29th, 2016 06:15 am (UTC)
I'm complimented to have a Latinist find my coinage fitting, and delighted to have given pleasure to your students.

Latest Month

October 2019
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Page Summary

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by yoksel